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"When South Africans celebrate the diverse cultural heritage that makes up a 'rainbow nation'. It is the day to celebrate the contribution of all South Africans to the building of South Africa."

                                                                                                                                                  - Lowery

Heritage day was derived from Shaka Day. Where the Kwazulu Natal people gathered to commemorate the legendary Zulu King; who played an important role in uniting disparate Zulu clans into a cohesive nation. The Public Holidays Bill presented this date to the Parliament of South Africa for inclusion as a national public holiday. It was passed in 1995 under a new title "Heritage Day".

Heritage Day invites South Africans to remember the diverse cultural heritage that make up the population of South Africa. Below we commemorate three brave South African women that shaped South Africa's history, contributed to reform, and equality for all. Leaving the heritage of democracy in their wake.

ZULU WOMEN

ZULU WOMEN

 

REMEMBER, CELEBRATE the HERITAGE of THE WOMEN CHARTER.

 

BRAVE WOMEN STORY 

 Helen Joseph, Lilian Ngoyi and Amina Cachalia

Over sixty years ago 146 women of all races, lead by Helen Joseph, Lilian Ngoyi, and Amina Cachalia, representing 230 000 women from a range of struggling organisations and trade unions, gathered in Johannesburg to draw up the Women's Charter. One of the first documents to map out a vision for a post-apartheid South Africa.

The Charter represented wives, mothers, working women; Women of African, Indian, European, and Coloured descent. This declared the aim to strive for the removal of all laws, regulations, conventions, and customs that discriminate against women. That deprived them in any way of their inherent right to the advantages, responsibilities and opportunities that society offers to any one section of the population.

The Women's Charter was a groundbreaking document, which brought women's rights into a broader demand by the liberation movement. Its stipulations were eventually incorporated into the Freedom Charter.

"IT IS NOT THE HONOUR THAT YOU TAKE WITH YOU BUT THE HERITAGE YOU LEAVE."

                                                                                                                     -Branch Rickey

The African Ndebele, The women of the Ndebele culture, with its vibrant aesthetics, express their status in society by the way they adorn and ornament themselves. It is an enlivened exhibition of identity and power.

The African Ndebele, The women of the Ndebele culture, with its vibrant aesthetics, express their status in society by the way they adorn and ornament themselves. It is an enlivened exhibition of identity and power.

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