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Brave Women


 WOMEN #02

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Brave Women


 WOMEN #02

 

The Women series is an archive of intimate portraits of the courageous woman that wear
PICHULIK accessories. 

Jewellery in African tribology has served to mark initiatory transitions and has aggregated women's circles where stories and blessings were shared and communities were made. PICHULIK pieces can be worn as talismans to a community of bold brave women, and here we document sensitive investigations into these women’s lives.  

 
 
 
 

 

MEET OUR WOMEN AND THE
INSPIRING STORIES TOLD THROUGH
PICHULIK JEWELLERY.

 
 
 
 

"SHE MANAGES TO CALM AND COAX EFFECTIVE ANSWERS FROM EVEN THE MOST RELUCTANT INTERVIEWEES, COMPLEMENTING THEIR ANSWERS WITH HER OWN INDIVIDUAL FLAVOUR OF COMMENTARY TO PRESENT THE FULL PICTURE. "

Talia Sanhewis an award winning reporter who has worked for CNBC Africa, CNN International, Oprah Magazine and Forbes Africa.

In 2009, Talia won the Vodacom Journalist of the Year in the Television News Category for her piece focusing on HIV/AIDS prevention through social entrepreneurship. Starting her own production company, Talia production, she now exercises her ambitions as an entrepreneur, producer and keynote speaker.

 
 
 
 
 

Talia has forged a space of her own in the realm of storytelling, and through her sensitive and insightful approach
has extracted honest and intimate interviews
from a plethora of high profile subjects.

Her courage to go after opportunities, even in risky climates, has won her the respect of her colleagues. Unchartered ground being her terrain of choice has meant that her career is testament to her trust and faith in the face of the unknown. Usually camera ready in the spotlight, these portraits of Talia serve to reveal the subtleties of her nature, and the abundance of contemplation and spiritual enquiry that underpin and nourish this brave woman’s’ success.

 

 

 
 
 

TALIA wears aGATE QUEEN

STILLS TOMMASO FISCALETTIVIDEO JOHNATHAN MELLISH.
 

If you wear PICHULIK and feel akin to this way of being — share your story.

#BraveWomen

 
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Brave Women


 WOMEN #01

Brave Women


 WOMEN #01

 
 
 
 

Courage is not defined by any demographic or by any specific act.
It is a conscious way of being,
of taking leaps of faith
into the unknown. 

Every act of being — an offering.

 
 
 
 

The courage to be creative when you don’t know where your art is taking you. Leaving when it is braver to walk away gracefully than to stay and fight. To show up at work even when your heart left with him. Giving up the corporate job to write that book that has been growing in you for years. Keeping her because you know she was meant to be born. Making those sandwiches at 5 am just the way he likes them. 

 
 
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Meet our women and the
inspiring stories told through
PICHULIK jewellery.

Lucie De Moyencourt works as an architect, set designer and illustrator and painter. She has no formal training as a painter, but with an astute and sensitive way of observing her world she captures moments in time. She is an inspired and infectious woman whose work reverberates with her genuine passion for Africa, people and transformation. Her prolific filling of countless journals is a natural expression of her courageous commitment to "making" and the trust required in any creative process.

 
 
 

Lucie wears The Moor

STILLS TOMMASO FISCALETTIVIDEO JOHNATHAN MELLISH.
MUSIC CUTTING GEMS. ART DIRECTION FEED.

If you wear PICHULIK and feel akin to this way of being — share your story.

#pichulikwomen

 
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Dialogue 1


DIALOGUE I

Dialogue 1


DIALOGUE I

In conversation with Jessica Bonin 

Founder and owner of Lady Bonin's Tea Parlour

Founder and owner of Lady Bonin's Tea Parlour

“The act of ceremony is a mindfulness practice. By bringing your mind in to
focus with a choreographed set of movements and processes, you eliminate
opportunities for the mind to become distracted with the outside word. This
gives the mind less power and allows you to be an active creator in your world.
It’s an act of meditation, a yoga.”
 

Q: You’ve been involved in a love affair with tea for the past 8 years. Describe your

first experience that you recall of tea and the impression it make upon you?

 

A: It was my childhood circumstances that make it part of my every day life. In

boarding school it was the way we connected, the ceremony where we shared so

many moments of laughter, soothing sadness, reflecting on moments and just having

fun. My grandmother taught me about its mysticism by showing me how you can

taste love in tea, how the way you make it reflects the very nature of your mind at the

moment through its flavour. When I had these realisations I looked at tea in a whole

new way. It began a process of mindfulness and observation that created in me a

serenity, equipping me to handle my every day challenges.

 

Q: Tea has such an ancient and rich multi-cultural history. How do you embrace the

richness of the past and marry it with the contemporary?

 

A: I love the way ancient cultures harmonised with the world. They did not see a

separation between themselves and the environment. Tea is a means through which

I want to create a space where worlds collide, people connect and divides are

severed. Tea is common to all the world… it has the magic to bring people together

and bring people back to themselves.  We do this by creating ways people can

integrate tea into their daily lives in a contemporary way without overwhelming them

or requiring extended periods of time to prepare and enjoy. We summarise the

process that still allows a small opportunity to be present, thereby giving the

beneficial effects, without disrupting or creating expansive effort. The tea really does

the rest of the work.

 

Q: You talk about the healing properties of tea. Is this deeply important to you and

does it somehow reflect your own personal journey?

 

A: Tea is an incredible way to achieve serenity, and serenity creates the ability for us

to better handle our every day challenges. The samurai created something called

Wabi - The Way. It was a process by which they attributed every act as an art. By

being present one is able to calm the mind and simultaneously the body. This ability

is what made the Samurai so formidable. They moved this mind practice into other

arts and tea became an integral part of their means to attain serenity. The very

process of preparing tea requires focus… presence. The very physiological effects

produce the same conditions - uniting mind and body. When I am in this state I can

better handle my experiences, taking into consideration the consequences of every

thought, word and action, because it’s our thoughts, words and actions that create

our experiences. Tea has over 2000 different beneficial chemicals in each leaf that

has an interaction with the body, explaining why the Chinese founded it as a

medicine over 4000 years ago, and why it’s still so prominent today.

 

Q: You’ve just opened a tea ceremonial room. Describe to us the power behind the

act of ceremony?

 

A: The act of ceremony is a mindfulness practice. By bringing your mind in to focus

with a choreographed set of movements and processes, you eliminate opportunities

for the mind to become distracted with the outside word. This gives the mind less

power and allows you to be an active creator in your world. It’s an act of meditation, a

yoga. We hope to share this practice with people in our Cape Town and

Johannesburg spaces, providing them with respite from the chaos of the outside

world so they can also extend this into their home, inspiring change.

 

Q: You are a great reader. Share something with us that you recently encountered

that you made an intimate connection with, an insight

 

A: I am a lover of philosophy and old world spirituality. I just read an amazing book

on love called the 40 Rules of Love by Elif Safak. It delves into the life of my favourite

poet, Rumi. It talks about Rumi’s process of discovering the nature of the world and

the nature of himself through the ultimate nature of all things - love. As tea dictates,

we’re not separate from our environment. This book explores this concept, and if we

embrace this commonality, we can cultivate love as the core of all. And love is a

beautiful place from which we can heal the many divides of this world.

 

#pichulikwomen

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Maker


MAKER

Maker


MAKER

In conversation with Nadya von Stein 

Fashion designer at PICHULIK

Fashion designer at PICHULIK

“The creative process is both an inward and outward journey. Inwardly I
need to love myself unconditionally, imbuing all I do with positive energy,
good intentions, love and compassion. This is key to my integrity and creating
a collection that is authentic. Outwardly, I love perceiving the world in new
ways and finding hidden patterns in my daily life.”
 

Q: Describe your first memory of fabric. What was it? The colour? The sensations?

 

A: When I was about 5 years old I distinctly remember my mom's hand-wheel Singer

sewing machine. Over weekends, she’d spend her spare time making curtains with

loads of mint fabric - proper 90’s style – strewn all over the house. The best was the

shocking pink and purple/blue tie backs that she has plaited to like koeksisters.

These minty curtains are still around and my mom still has them up in our house and

they still give me the feeling of safety and security every time I come home.

 

Q: Both your Autumn/ Winter and Spring/ Summer collections last year have a

hallmark of both simple lines and beautiful muted colours. Does this harmony reflect

something internal that you are striving to communicate in the physical world?

 

A: Our hand-dyed hemp fabric in muted colours to suit the particular season exudes

harmony, and this reflects my drive to be at peace with the universe and myself.

Many people obtain harmony in different ways and I feel that through design, I find

this sense of balance and strive to reflect it in all our capsule collections.

 

Q: When mapping your creative journey with design, do you look outwards and /or

inwards?  How does the process work for you?

 

A: The creative process is both an inward and outward journey. Inwardly I need to

love myself unconditionally, imbuing all I do with positive energy, good intentions,

love and compassion. This is key to my integrity and creating a collection that is

authentic. Outwardly, I love perceiving the world in new ways and finding hidden

patterns in my daily life.

 

Q: In the fast paced world of fashion, how important if it to ‘know thyself’? Is it

relevant to listen to the voice within?

 

A: We need to shed our wrong and unreal patterning and concepts, thoughts and

beliefs and open ourselves to a new way of being that is more conscious, in tune with

that inner voice and in sync with your surrounds.

 

Q: We all talk about growth .. emotional, spiritual, creative.  For you as a woman and

a designer, when do you experience the greatest growth. Is it in moments of

brokenness, stillness, inspiration?  

 

A: When I have balance in my life, I find that my creativity flows at its optimum.

Brokenness can unhinge me. What’s important to me is setting goals in every area

of my life, making time to realise myself on a daily basis. Most of all be willing to take

risks. That’s when I need that inner voice to give me strength and confidence to

throw caution to the wind and go for it!

 

#pichulikwomen

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Object


OBJECT

Object


OBJECT

Cast brass knot used in the latest Pichulik for Maison Mara collection 

Cast brass knot used in the latest Pichulik for Maison Mara collection 

Knots are ancient symbols with a multitude of meanings across legends, mythology,

religions and cultures. The Pichulik knot in the Maison Mara collection is based on

the The True Lover’s Knot - a decorative knot symbolising true love.

According to tradition, a young couple would take a small limb of a tree and tie a

lover’s knot. If the knot held and grew for approximately a year, their love would stay

true!

 

Shop here 

#pichulikwomen